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What is your level of engineering/physics knowledge?

Discussion in 'General' started by Warlord, Nov 20, 2013.

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  1. RustedKitsune

    RustedKitsune Trainee Engineer

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    32
    I have basic physics combined with an intense interest in crunchy science-fiction and practical engineering, basic avionics training, some electrical engineering training, a somewhat intuitive grasp of mechanical engineering, and a hunger for more knowledge.
     
  2. Blako

    Blako Apprentice Engineer

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    385
    Student of computer science but with interests in physics, structural engineering, and fluid (aero)dynamics. Knowledgeable folks are needed to add content to the unofficial wikia. https://spaceengineers.wikia.com/wiki/Physics To me this is beauty.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. FurnaceRocker4

    FurnaceRocker4 Trainee Engineer

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    I graduated pretty recently in Mechanical Engineering Technology. I currently work as a maintenance manager in a steel mill, so the thing that really drew me into this game was it's problem solving that it promised to have, and the fact that it had welders and tools in it.
     
  4. Radma Kanow

    Radma Kanow Apprentice Engineer

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    Hi fellow Engineers,

    as for me - I'm complete noob in terms of RL engineering (heck, I even had problems once with proper spelling of that word :rolleyes: ), my math, physics and calculations skills are next to my ability to levitate, mind control.

    But I have what people call common sense, quite well developed spatial imagination and some tinkering skill. I understand how things work, can make several myself, but as mentioned earlier - more tinkering rather than hard science.

    I think that my hobby - RC helis and trucks - helps me a bit. Both gave me basics of design, mechanics and aerodynamics. But among all those qualified and certified engineers I'd like to think of myself as McGuyver-wannabe - give me blocks, battery and fire extinguisher and I'll make you a Space Ship.

    Cheers.
     
  5. Evito

    Evito Apprentice Engineer

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    The skewing in favour of a lot of physics literate people in the game is most likely easily explained by first A: Not nearly all people skulk the forums B: People noninclined with physics might not even open a thread such as this C: The game style very propably means that most are atleast interested in physics even if they didn't understand it comprehensively.

    Most games with a tendency for authentic physics and themes do attract scientifically inclined people in rather large numbers since they generally aren't as inclined towards arcade or poor authenticity in games.


    EDIT: My own level of knowledge includes some electrical engineering, circuits and such.
    Physics - little formal tuitition but spend on average 1-2 hours per day reading about it (seriously).
    Mechanics to a good general knowledge level due to some projects im in the middle of.
     
  6. Kamoba

    Kamoba Senior Engineer

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    1,389
    Over 100,000 people purchased the game...
    And some of the most popular polls don't reach 1k, so it is very safe to say the above statement is so very very true...
     
  7. ShaggyAMT

    ShaggyAMT Apprentice Engineer

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    I put myself in the practical knowledge category. My formal education includes flight training (Private Pilot License holder with hours also towards instrument rating), and I have my A&P Certification (aircraft mechanic). My hobbies include designing, building, and flying RC aircraft; designing, building, and testing small-scale wind turbines; analog electronics, and I'm working on learning some digital programming/coding using an Arduino. I own, upgrade ,and do my own work on a 17 foot fishing skiff (Boston Whaler). I'm an expert in "ghetto-engineering" as well.
     
  8. Mac D

    Mac D Junior Engineer

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    521
    I generally agree with Catfish on this.

    Good that someone is asking this question as a poll. Not sure if/when we will find out what the breakdown of the 100,000+ users is, but interesting to know about some of those on the forum in the meantime.

    This game was "marketed" on realistic physics and looks like LEGO in space, so I would not be surprised that the (target) audience is biased heavily towards those who are formally trained in science/engineering or otherwise very interested in it.

    I stopped most formal physics training at about first year university level, but have completed qualifications in science generally and work in laboratories.

    I was raised on LEGO, watch plenty of Mythbusters, and definitly like the challange of McGuyvering together a spacecraft from functional blocks to work in an environment governed by realistic physics.

    I like the more non-combat and sand-box aspects of this game as well as the potential for combat in the future.

    However, would prefer any space combat to develop "naturally" with users forced to create/optimise feasible weapons and defenses out of multi-use generic functional blocks.

    It is about time a game seriously made this possible.

    My general view is that most other games force us to learn some "Hollywood physics" in order to become competent at those games. If I am going to have to (re)learn a set of game rules, and then be limited by them, I would definitely prefer those rules to be realistic physics based ones.
     
  9. Bort

    Bort Trainee Engineer

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    79
    I have learned many skills in my 38 years of life. From diesel mechanics building our own rock breakers and crushers, cranes, and tools from slabs of steel and I beams using motors and generators to computer programming and technical repair to robotics, electronics, mechanical, structural, aeronautics, and digital engineering. Mostly just a hobby. I pick things up quickly and sometimes put all of these skills I've learned through mentors and apprenticeships together to solve problems at work or in life in general. I've built my own roaming, motion detecting, voice activated robot (Halloween gag, made 7' tall robot grim reaper that detected and chased people around the house party), build guitars from blocks of wood, helped create PHP-Nuke web site packages from 1997-2010, and hold a patent for inventing a self propelled indefinite hydrogen power plant theory.
    I have no degree or education other than hands on experiments that include a lot of destruction and derpsplosions (BANGS!) through trial and error. I'm not always the sharpest or best knife in the drawer, I do some dumb s__ some times! But I can be amazingly smart and productive at times too.
     
  10. Andarne

    Andarne Apprentice Engineer

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    I've done welding (MIG, TIG and arc) so that's about the limit of my engineering practicality. I do know, however, that if I turn off inertia dampers, and gently tap something, it'll keep on floating until it hits something.
     
  11. Guerrero

    Guerrero Trainee Engineer

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    4
    I have a BS in mechanical engineering and are half way through my MS in Vehicle engineering. I taking a lot of courses together with friends that studies Space Engineering. I would say that I have very good theoretical knowledge about physics and especially mechanics in vehicles and in space. I'm a fan of Si-Fi and sandbox games.

    This game has a great potential but is not quite what I'm looking for... Yet? I guess I'm one of the more demanding players... There are a lot of physics in this game that doesn't correspond to how the real world functions witch is OK to some extent (e.g. max speed in space due to computational issues) but that e.g. Thrustsers apply force in the center of mass instead of where they are placed (this way they can't apply torque) TAKES A WAY so muchof the DESIGN POSSIBILITIES!! As a vehicle engineer i won't to be able to create spacecrafts with different handling capabilities based on their geometry not just the nr of gyros and/or thrusters! This is actually, and sadly, the MAIN REASON to way I don't find this game satisfying and DON'T PLAY IT.

    I'm looking for a "true" physic sandbox game that lets me create stuff (preferably in space) that works according to at least the laws of Newton (Einsteins relativity theory might be harder to implement in a game, i don't know. I'm not a programmer even though I know some of that too).

    I would really like to here what you guys think =)

    Thanks for reading!
     
  12. Lunavi

    Lunavi Trainee Engineer

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    32
    I'm...related to some engineers? That's pretty much it. My SO is a physics PhD graduating this year, dad is an electrical engineer working in aerospace. I took a physics class once in high school. I have a crap ton of Lego's.
     
  13. Dreokor

    Dreokor Senior Engineer

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    I'm in the level:

    Played with Legos and massive use of trial and error.
     
  14. Skeloton

    Skeloton Master Engineer

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    I have no idea what level of knowledge I have. I probably do but I don't realise it.
     
  15. qbot3000

    qbot3000 Trainee Engineer

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    Interesting how many people had LEGO sets growing up. They were always my favorite toy, and I can't wait until my 10 month old son is old enough to start playing with them. I guess it's the idea of creating something original from pieces that attracted me to SE. I've never seen another game like this. In almost any game where you're given different parts, you're only allowed to put them together in a limited number of ways. But there are almost an infinite number of creations you could build in SE. Just like with LEGOs. It's only limited by your imagination (and whether you imagine working pistons or not).
     
  16. Detoxifier

    Detoxifier Trainee Engineer

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    Ive logged like 800 hours in Kerbal space program, so I'd say I have a pretty good handle on physics...in kerbal space program. :cool:

    I did some study of chemistry, physics, and chaos in college but I didn't major in it...I wish I had though.
     
  17. Latsabb

    Latsabb Senior Engineer

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    1,019
    At first I was wondering how I managed to miss this thread. Then I saw the date...

    I am a chemical engineer, with a focus on process design. My good friends all have some sort of job involving environment technology, many trying to make the world a better place. I, meanwhile, help Norway pump and refine oil more effectively... ;)
     
  18. Echillion

    Echillion Senior Engineer

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    1,334
    College trained Automobile Technician (Above a mechanic) over 20+ years of working on family and friends cars and 30+ years of working on construction projects from minor DIY to house extentions. I have also worked on pleasure boats ( mainly motor cruisers) and currently a Forklift driver.

    Edit: Ooops! I didn't realise this was a necro thread my bad :(


    I also had a lot of what is now called "Classic" Space Lego when it was new! My biggest regret was selling it!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 24, 2015
  19. Devon_v

    Devon_v Senior Engineer

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    1,602
    I had lots of Legos when I was a kid. Actually they're in a box in the attic at the moment. I built space ships.
     
  20. Cydramech

    Cydramech Junior Engineer

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    I practically had a house full of Legos. 'Nuff said.
     
  21. Skeloton

    Skeloton Master Engineer

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    4,069
    Technically I just had a couple of crates of lego. The only set I had was the AT-AT....which became a mothership of some kind.
     
  22. Guerrero

    Guerrero Trainee Engineer

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    4
    So guys! With your level of knowledge in physics, do you find the physics in this game to be realistic or not? Is it satisfying for you?
     
  23. tankmayvin

    tankmayvin Senior Engineer

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    2,864
    The speed cap at 100 m/s and the fact that thrusters produce no moments on the grid they are attached to really confused me for a while.

    I also came into the game assuming blocks had strength - ie holding megatons together with a single block would cause it to break.
     
  24. Danzarlo

    Danzarlo Apprentice Engineer

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    Wait this isnt space magic simulator?!?!?!?
     
  25. soat7ch

    soat7ch Junior Engineer

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    I had a ton of Legos too. Also some very early form (not sure if it was from Lego too) of Lego technic with a ton of motors, rails, gears and so on that my grandpa bought for my father sometime in the 70's.
    I'm currently doing my second education. First one was winemaker, this one is Automations engineer.
     
  26. LFCavalcanti

    LFCavalcanti Senior Engineer

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    1,378
    I mean, is this even relevant?

    I have a degree in IT(Information Systems), I study on my own Physcs("traditional" and "Quantum Mechanics"), I also love anything related to astronomy and astrophysics.
     
  27. erdrik

    erdrik Apprentice Engineer

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    229
    Took a physics and material science class while getting my associates for CADDT, and applied science class while in tech school in the military.
    Aside from that I like reading about science, discoveries, and theory when I can, but have had no further formal education or experience.

    Except Legos. I totes had Legos. :D lol
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 23, 2015
  28. fusurugi

    fusurugi Junior Engineer

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    I'm a "chemical engineer" (english job name), altough I there's no degree for it except my certificate of competence I received after completing apprenticeship.
    I'm very interested in technology in general, and go mad over the very low level (= as engineery as it gets) stuff in the game in regular intervals.

    And I had about 50kg of zero-tech lego. 80s oldschool stuff.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 24, 2015
  29. aboredteen1

    aboredteen1 Junior Engineer

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    514
    uh the things i know
    if i put a thruster on the back of a ship it moves opposite of the blue flame.
    gyros are weird thingy that defy logic
    the enemy's gate is down
    there is no up
    math is a impractical subject
    centripical force pulls thing to the outside
    for every force there is an equal but opposite force
    after flying 12 parsecs faster than han i realized force is fake and no amount of trickery and nonsense will make me believe in physics
    gravity some times is real
    question everything
    every rule you've been told have a dozen and a half exceptions and then exceptions for the exceptions
    creativity is key
    results are first the possess is second

    from a high school senior

    and legos lots of legos 3 bins of 3 foot x 5 foot x .5 foot
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 24, 2015
  30. Tristavius

    Tristavius Senior Engineer

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    1,368
    Studies Computing at University so nothing related but since leaving Uni my career took a very different path.

    I am a hydrographic surveyor in the oil and gas industry; this is a combination of naval engineering, survey and a bunch of other stuff. Through dealing with satellites and through personal hobbies I have a high level of understanding of Orbital Mechanics and space in general and naval architecture has become a hobby in recent years (the design and engineering of ships).

    Overall Space Engineers is quite a good fit for me!

    THe modding stuff if new, both the modelling and the graphics work, really only started in the last 6 months though I've put a ton of work into it,
     
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