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My ship designs look very... human

Discussion in 'General' started by MichaelC, Oct 19, 2014.

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This last post in this thread was made more than 31 days old.
  1. MichaelC

    MichaelC Junior Engineer

    Messages:
    593
    You ever stop and look at your ship designs and realize that your ships look like.. well... ships. Longer than they are wide, pronounced bridge on the top and towards the rear, and looked like they could float on water if u needed to.

    for a ship built entirely in space you could do a flying wall, or an upright stick (think the pride of Hiigarra from homeworld) yet all my designs look, well, like a human built it.

    Anyone else ever notice this about their designs?
     
  2. PaladinX333

    PaladinX333 Apprentice Engineer

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    234
    My two largest designs look like something out of star trek. One is a star ship looking thing with practical engine nacelles. The other one is a borg cube type of ship that is too large to be of any real use (it has a working six way gravity drive). Most of the rest of my large ships look like rectangles with engines. Not one of them looks like it could float.
     
  3. ROFLNUT

    ROFLNUT Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    123
    - I build my ships longer then they are wide so it has a low profile when facing directly at an enemy.
    - I have a cockpit with good visibility, sometimes more than one. (I like to play in 1st person. xP)

    Other than that my ships look very different to one that would "float on water"

    Nothing is wrong with these designs, I guess the human brain just tries to make relations to things we've seen before. :)
     
  4. Devon_v

    Devon_v Senior Engineer

    Messages:
    1,602
    It's an issue with being human. Precisely why my latest ship is starting with an X-COM large scout form as a base.
     
  5. Skeloton

    Skeloton Master Engineer

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    4,069
    I havent a clue what my ships look like. I played alot of Homeworld, Freelancer and Freespace 2 which i believe influenced my designs but im so random its hard for me to tell.
     
  6. Shiliski

    Shiliski Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    290
    My ships don't look anything like naval ships. Some of them look kinda like planes or triangles, but I try to optimize them for the current rules of the game and those rules change all the time (for the better).

    Some of my ships just look like bricks or pods. I tend to think "I need to get this to work" before I think "What does this even look like?".
     
  7. Arcturus

    Arcturus Senior Engineer

    Messages:
    1,649
    Space is air, space is an ocean, naval ship classes/names (despite the RL space program being an air force thing), decks parallel to the direction of travel, gray greebled bricks, etc...

    Unless you mount the control chairs/cockpits at 90° to the deck, the game is biased against doing a ship where the decks are perpendicular to the direction of travel.

    If the ship needs to take off and land often, it may make sense to put a windowed cockpit or control room on the bottom (side with landing gear).
     
  8. GotLag

    GotLag Senior Engineer

    Messages:
    1,114
    I build my large ships long and thin, with a small frontal area, and most of the thrusters pushing the ship forward. It's a practical shape. Concentrating thrust in one direction saves materials and mass, and you can always turn the ship when you want to make a major course change. Small frontal area means your ship can fit in more places and decreases your size as a target for enemy fire and floating debris when underway. With gravity generators it's easier to build ships with a flat crew deck running the length of the ship, as stacking floors with gravity pointing in the direction of travel means a lot of space is wasted on stairs or other access.

    That said, my ships generally look like inverted naval vessels: a solid armoured carapace running along the spine of the ship with everything else suspended from it. It looked good in Homeworld and it looks good in Space Engineers.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 19, 2014
  9. Danzarlo

    Danzarlo Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    182
    Does this look human?
    [​IMG]
     
  10. mhalpern

    mhalpern Senior Engineer

    Messages:
    2,119
    it looks almost Dalek, like a classic dalek hover pad only much larger
     
  11. Mansen

    Mansen Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    481
    No no no - That's not how you do a Human looking ship.

    Meet Megamaid.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Lockleed

    Lockleed Trainee Engineer

    Messages:
    3
    My ship designs have proven to be prettty varied, actually. I know exactly what you mean about a "human" design... more length than width, decks, symetrical design, and often thruster pods / nacelles. I kind of think it depends on how you go about it though. In survival, the first ships I build are always utilitarian, and symmetry, decks, and anything resembling aesthetics gets tossed out the window. They're ugly as sin and range from squid-like small miners to imbalanced refining / assembling ships. That aside, they get the job done. Second stage of ships I build are more aesthetic and human. Hell, I just finished a warship on the server I play that looks similar to a submarine.

    But even then, I've had ships that looked like a narwhal (extended forward ramming boom), a flying wing (think Cobra Mk.
    3), and one big ass welding ship that looked like a mishapen horseshoe. Most of these were built in multiplayer survival, as well.

    OP, are your ships built in creative or survival? Its easy to go "human" with your designs when you don't have to worry about the overall utility and resources required for what you are cranking out.
     
  13. Danzarlo

    Danzarlo Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    182
    I never thought about that before!
     
  14. Kuu Lightwing

    Kuu Lightwing Senior Engineer

    Messages:
    1,503
    EX-TER-MI-NATE!
     
  15. Peter Smythe

    Peter Smythe Trainee Engineer

    Messages:
    60
    Half and half. It ends up being mostly decided by what the ship needs to be and do. On one hand, a needle-like ship provides a very small target with extreme sectional density. On the other, it provides a target that can be easily rendered impossible to navigate on the inside by a small number of weapon hits. Additionally, long thin ships can have good thrust with their actual thrusters, and have to really fully on gravity drive for forward motion.
     
  16. FallingWhale

    FallingWhale Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    202
    I tend to end up with things that look like a modern frigate if I don't go in with a goal.
     
  17. Killaim

    Killaim Trainee Engineer

    Messages:
    57
    [​IMG]
    I ..eh...yeah - Also the rest of the thing will be bloody humongous (hah human)

    https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=326654882 (if interested)
     
  18. Martinineter

    Martinineter Senior Engineer

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    2,253
    That is taking it to a whole new level...
     
  19. Catastrophy

    Catastrophy Trainee Engineer

    Messages:
    23
    From a design perspective the wedge form of imperial Star Destroyers is very good. In a 3D combat theater placing the weapons along the side (a bit protruding) will enable them to all fire forward, upward and downward.

    A classic "human" battleship design usually limits the firing arc of a part of the weapons. You know you want all the firepower. Bring those guns to bear!
     
  20. blizzerd

    blizzerd Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    478
    “Remember, the enemy's gate is down.”

    Maybe you should stop designing a ship with a "down" in mind

    Also "ship" like spaceships are actually quite reasonable designs since structurally the most force will be applied in 1 direction (ie forwards) only the decks if gravity supported will probably be either "down is outside of ship in a circle" or "down is towards the engines"

    First one would use centrifugal forces to maintain gravity, its cheap and easy to maintain (give it a spin and it will keep going as long as people dont all walk in the opposite direction too much) downside is the spin makes manoeuvring more complex, gravity becomes quite strong the closer you are to the outside of the ship and weaker to the inside causing unexpected behaviour as you travel trough it and everything inside will look curved.

    the second one uses a constant acceleration of 1G to get 1 earth gravity and the feeling of sitting in an apartment complex (1g speed is quite slow from a standstill perspective, but 1 g acceleration can be close to the speed of light but increasing with 1G if possible)
     
  21. Andeerz

    Andeerz Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    172
    I try to build my vessels as if there was realistic physics in the game (such as torque being applied by thrusters about center of mass), so I end up having engines placed where they can apply appropriate torque for maneuvering and stuff (as far as I can tell with the limited tools available in game). Though it is completely useless to do so at this point, I hope one day some intrepid modder or the game devs make an option for more realistic physics, and then I could put my designs to the test. I also like to put my reactors as far away from wherever people would be on the ship and have space for heat sinks; again, useless, but I like to pretend. :3

    Also, I find my ships being longer than wide or wider than long so as to have increased surface area to put various doodads, particularly solar panels. Also, what GotLag said about thrusters!
     
  22. Infekted

    Infekted Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    359
    The two things that's helped me make better looking ships (I'm still not great).

    Have a design concept in mind when you build it.

    Use a double hull to make it more interesting. Just because the inner hull shape looks kind of basic, there's nothing much stopping you adding another hull on the outside that looks better. Provided ofc you design it with enough power/gyros/thrusters to move the increased mass. Double hulls help a lot with protection as well.
     
  23. KirathianUK

    KirathianUK Trainee Engineer

    Messages:
    44
    I've been designing my ships along the lines of E E Doc Smith's Skylark series, so mostly spheres of varying sizes. Least amount of materials for maximum volume.
     
  24. SF-1 Raptor

    SF-1 Raptor Junior Engineer

    Messages:
    740
    What about this. The Stardust-class Heavy Freighter...
    [​IMG]
    It does't really have a pronounced bridge, but I see was you mean.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 22, 2014
  25. Blako

    Blako Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    385
    It is true many people design ships with the weapons only on the top. My refusal to make a box spawned this:

    [​IMG]

    Now that I look back on it... I may have been unknowingly influenced: :D

    [​IMG]

    You know what would be cool to build? Guess! Guess! A Lionfish! with solar fins. :idea:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Source: https://conceptships.blogspot.com/
    You can build however you want, I'm just no longer impressed by yet another star ship Enterprise.

    That's awesome Kirathian!
    [​IMG]
     
  26. ataaron

    ataaron Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    293
    The thumb has one part too much tho
     
  27. Communist Penguin

    Communist Penguin Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    148
    I like to build longer thin vessels since it is more aestheticly pleasing, however due to forward firing weapons and thrusters, short fat ships tend to be more practical. For this reason, I've been focusing most of my weapon designs on laterally-deploying forwards firing torpedoes.
     
  28. SaturaxCZ

    SaturaxCZ Senior Engineer

    Messages:
    1,718
    Yea ! I have same problem.... :rof: totaly human ships... Do not you think? :thumb:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 22, 2014
  29. inventor200

    inventor200 Apprentice Engineer

    Messages:
    446
    My ships tend to look like the Von Braun from Alien Planet, so yeah...
     
  30. GrendelPrime

    GrendelPrime Trainee Engineer

    Messages:
    10
    Most of my ships start out with a cruciform superstructure, but often undergo drastic design changes while being built as new ideas strike me.
    Asymmetrical ships still really appeal to me, moreso when CoG has to be taken into account.
     
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