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Stonework design period

Discussion in 'General' started by boromir, Dec 25, 2019.

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  1. boromir

    boromir Apprentice Engineer

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    What is the earliest period one could see stonework in this square archway done?
    archway

    More specifically, the angled shaped stones creating the horizontal span across the top of the archway.
     
  2. Cetric

    Cetric Junior Engineer

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    814
    I think that is a technique which is very old, certainly known already in Antiquity. The sense behind those angled shaped stones is they are less likely to get lose and fall down, the weight above them is better diverted in diagonal direction and led down through the jambs, into the wall. Such knowledge evolve from practical experience by generations of masons.
    Article in German about history of architraves: https://www.db-bauzeitung.de/db-empfiehlt/produkte/balken-und-boegen/#slider-intro-12
     
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  3. ibisgrunk

    ibisgrunk Apprentice Engineer

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    196
    voussoirs! i see voussoirs! or do i because that is for an arch and not necessarily for a horizontal crossing like a Lintel? cetric's link calls them, and this could be bad translating, as a "right-angled arch"... i guess a lintel is a single piece like a mantelpiece above a fireplace and voussoirs should apply regardless of being a roman arch or a right angled arch?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voussoir says "The keystone is often decorated or enlarged. An enlarged and sometimes slightly dropped keystone is often found in Mannerist arches of the 16th century, beginning with the works of Giulio Romano, who also began the fashion for using voussoirs above rectangular openings, rather than a lintel (Palazzo Stati Maccarani, Rome, circa 1522)."

    damnit you two always make me research more than my simple mind should allow...

    see https://hoffnerphysics.weebly.com/roman-arch.html, https://www.ontarioarchitecture.com/voussoir.htm, https://www.pyromasse.ca/articles/jacs_e.html which makes me want to call them voussoirs regardless of arch angling...

    the aging is frustrating but imho it looks Roman... i dont know why the french word is being used, and searching for first use of that word produces nothing specific but i like https://www.academia.edu/19942370/_...in_Bath_Buildings_of_the_Western_Roman_Empire for time framing...

    tl;dr imho they are called voussoirs and are of late Roman age and later
     
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  4. Stardriver907

    Stardriver907 Master Engineer

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    3,368
    In Medieval Engineers, it's called a block.


    You guys stop trying to leave the rest of us behind.
     
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  5. Cetric

    Cetric Junior Engineer

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    814
    https://www.pyromasse.ca/articles/jacs_e.html
    This is a nice link provided by ibisgrunk, with practical use. So now everyone of us can turn into medieval engineer in real life and create "voussoir" type architraves in his castle ... ehm... home.
    Personally, I think round archs look better than a rectangular span, they have such epic attitude. ;) Oh when I think of all those catacombs I used to build with archways in ME... However in that picture boromir started with there isn't enough space between door and ceiling to operate with archs.
     
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