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CCD - Compact Centrifuge Design (artificial gravity by centripetal force)

Discussion in 'Community Creations' started by Renfield37, Oct 30, 2017.

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This last post in this thread was made more than 31 days old.
  1. Renfield37 Trainee Engineer

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  2. Silentfighter89 Trainee Engineer

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    I like how you did the connection points to support the rotors... does it clang a lot? But as much as I know, rotational artificial gravity doesn't work in space engineers. Did you try to walk on the surface and don't loose grip?
     
  3. Renfield37 Trainee Engineer

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    Nope, fortunately clang has not happened. I set the outer rotors' displacement to -15 cm and the inner rotors to -25 cm. There is no pressure on the rotors at all it seems, but you never know what clang is thinking.. As for walking, I've been pretending with the mag boots with no slipping. The supports you see double as walkways and can be walked over with the mag boots. I've been using 2.5 rpm for the centrifuge rotation. I'm not sure what the exact rpm rate is to replicate the gravity force of earth, but in every sci-fi movie I've seen it's a brisk turn rate around that neighborhood.
     
  4. Renfield37 Trainee Engineer

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    I've been doing some reading up on rotating habitats and it appears that you cannot have the same shared centripetal force for each floor within the centrifuge. You have to spin the smaller concentric floors faster the closer you get to the center. So in reality with this habitat in question, if you had the lowest outer floor spinning fast enough to replicate earth gravity, each floor you went up the gravity would be lighter. This is great for me, because it gives me a new project to accomplish. Counter-rotating-paired-centrifuge with layered individually spinning floors, game on.
     
  5. Ronin1973 Master Engineer

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    4,797

    Yes, but this is the problem in real life with centripetal rotation as a substitute for natural gravity. Astronauts experience weaker amounts of force the closer to the axis of rotation they are stationed. Even the amount of gravity on their heads versus feet is an issue.

    Having multiple concentric spinning floors in entirely impractical.
     
  6. Renfield37 Trainee Engineer

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    Well as long as there is enough artificial gravity to circumvent the major biological problems of microgravity, I don't see it being impractical. The inner most floor has 15 meters between it and the center pinion shaft. It is true though that with any new environment like this there will have to be prolonged studies on human anatomy effects.
     
  7. Nasher Trainee Engineer

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    with some carfully calibration of the gravity generators you can make a spin gravity effect check out my B5 station the blue sector (front orb section) you can run around it with out mag boots or jetpack :D so its possible
     
  8. ZeroCore Apprentice Engineer

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    1: Nice Hyperion user-avatar (I fancy a Domi, Myrm, or VNI myself for my Gallente toon; drone boat FTW).

    2: Interesting rotational system. My question is this: is this attached to a static grid or a mobile grid? If it is attached to a mobile grid, how do you keep the torque of the spinning drum from making the whole assembly spin about itself? Also, how do you keep the long, tube-shaped drum from causing the whole thing to rotate across its center point (flip over end to end, as rotating cylinders do that)? Are you going to make two of them, stacked side by side, and have them rotate in opposing directions?
     
  9. Renfield37 Trainee Engineer

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    Thanks, I spent most of my time in Gallente drone boats too, but the Hype was the first battleship I learned to fly in EVE.

    The habitat is anchored inside an asteroid and it is a paired system. Whenever I make rotating systems I always make them counter-rotating-paired-centrifuges because of the torque issues you mentioned. The flip over the end phenomena is something I've seen real life astronauts demonstrate on the ISS over video stream. Thanks for mentioning it. It is really weird and interesting phenomena most people would not expect.
    --- Automerge ---
    Actually I was thinking of another shaped item they were spinning on the ISS that kept flipping over end to end in a weird way, but you're right, cylinders with objects/masses inside them begin to spin erratically over time.

     
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