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Designing A Less Flippy Rover (Vanilla)

Discussion in 'Community Creations' started by .Luca, Jun 21, 2019.

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This last post in this thread was made more than 31 days old.
  1. .Luca Trainee Engineer

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    Another short tutorial this time to help my fellow rover flippers :p

     
  2. mleise Trainee Engineer

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    My rovers mostly flipped due too much speed and going over hilltops, but also while turning, so the advice on flipping sideways due to wrong suspension settings is good. And I always braked in mid-air in panic mode, too. So that actually made it flip over even more! Should have at least accelerated instead. Gyros on the other hand I never used out of principle, but might have been less clangy and cumbersome than my hour long attempts at flipping it back with stacks of pistons. Very informative video.
     
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  3. mojomann71 Senior Engineer

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    1,586
    Wider wheelbase and less than 20% Steering Radius, about 15% to 17% is a good number.
    Has always worked for me.
     
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    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. .Luca Trainee Engineer

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    32
    Thanks! Glad you find it useful c= and yeah lol trying to flip over a rover back up can be quite tiresome without a gyroscope, I once dug a hole that put the whole rover in it when trying to dig the ground below it to unflip it LOL

    :tu:
     
  5. Ronin1973 Master Engineer

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    4,682
    Wheel friction. It's the most overlooked problem. If your friction is set too high, your wheels "bite" into the ground like a cat on carpet. If you're changing directions, you still have to deal with the velocity you've built up in the original direction of travel. A lower friction constant will allow the rover to skid or drift when it's turning too fast. If the friction is too high, it won't skid. It will anchor on the outside wheels and vault over them.

    I've found that having active gyroscopes helps to keep the vehicle level in a faster turn and prevent wheelies and stoppies. It's also really helpful if you get airborne and the rover isn't coming down flat.

    Space Engineers wheel vehicles are especially heavy compared to real world examples. Giving that much mass so much inertia and potential energy means a lot of flipping if you're trying to design a vehicle with some real world proportions in size. You need much longer and wider wheel bases. Once your center of gravity is past the edge of your tilted wheels... you're going over. Wider wheel bases mean a higher chance of bottoming out on uneven terrain but prevent roll-overs. So you have to find a happy medium or use an unorthodox design.
     
  6. Stardriver907 Senior Engineer

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    2,863
    The main reason SE vehicles flip is because they are inherently quite heavy yet you can still go quite fast. A small grid wheel suspension weighs more than your family car, and 104 m/s equates to 233 mph or 374 kph. Once reaching top speed it always seems like a good idea to make that sharp left...

    The original wheel suspensions were probably Keen's best work. You could tune every variable down to four decimal places. One of the best variables was steering speed. You could set the speed a wheel would turn, and you could separately set the speed by which the wheel would return to straight forward. Having access to all the original variable meant that you could accurately tune your suspension for both the terrain and your driving behavior. You could not, however, tune out a vehicle's propensity to roll if you tried to make a sharp turn at top speed. Therefore, people claimed wheel suspensions were broken and Keen needed to fix them. Keen looked at how people make wheeled vehicles and "factory tuned" them so that they would automatically work predictably, especially when combined with a gyro. Because in other games it's almost impossible to flip a vehicle, and SE should be the same.

    My opinion is if you use a gyro in a wheeled vehicle, you're doing it wrong, and if your vehicle constantly flips, you need to do something about that nut behind the wheel ;)
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. mojomann71 Senior Engineer

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    1,586
    :tu:
     
  8. Ronin1973 Master Engineer

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    I'll use the gyros... especially on high speed runs where I want to come down on all four rather than at the angle I left the planet.
     
  9. Stardriver907 Senior Engineer

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    2,863
    Heh.

    Given that all vehicles in SE have the same top speed, it's clear to me why some players seem to feel that the only solution for going faster than someone else is to glue down the W key. Apparently, once you are in motion Havok will do it's darndest to keep you going in that direction. If your "race car" happens to weigh 180,000 kg those gyros might be the only way to control what happens when you still flip. To some degree.

    However, many people might be surprised by how quickly they can reduce their odds of flipping by just tapping the brakes.



    Especially in a vehicle not weighed down with gyros ;)
     
  10. Mollymawk Trainee Engineer

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    91
    parachutes are great car savers.
    i fit gyros,gravity align script and parachutes... All OFF 99.999% of the time. but one click away from saving the day.
     
Thread Status:
This last post in this thread was made more than 31 days old.